Goodbyes are so cliche and depressing, we must say farewell. And by golly to our ‘Tuk Tuk’ who intends to hand his whites for good, a sailor is and should surely be on the cards to a man who epitomises Iqbal’s verse:

“Naram damay guftagu, Garam damay justaju.” Seven long years since Misbah took over the reign of the captaincy after the Pakistan Cricket team went through the fixing debacle in England 2010.

PTCL

“I am announcing my retirement from international cricket. The upcoming series against West Indies will be my last.“I will continue to play cricket at the domestic level. Regarding when I will leave domestic cricket, I will decide it later.”

“I’ve seen many ups and downs during my career. I was dropped from the team played poorly as well at times. But then I had some great moments too where we became the number one Test team in the world. So overall, I am satisfied with my performance.”

“I had some unfinished business, but that’s how life is. I had a dream of winning the World Cup for Pakistan, but then I also had a dream of captain the team in Pakistan. However, that is how life is. You don’t get everything you ask for.”

“We should not put pressure on Sarfraz; instead we should support him, I also believe that there should be only one captain, so all the players can support him.” – Misbah ul Haq

Now, with the curtain drawing close to an illustrious tenure as player and captain, I tend to reflect on what he has given us as a leader, player and a man. Well, one can’t refute the fact of his successes in test cricket albeit and in the majority in the UAE but you don’t just guide a team to the No.1 status just like that.

Our media is always critical of someone who is unassuming and keeps to him or herself, and how harsh they have been with our man Tuk Tuk. The way he has carried on with so much conjecture, speaks volumes of the man.

Misbah has always been the antithesis of a Pakistani cricketer, his approach being calculated, his captaincy almost philosophic and his style not attuned to what most pundits and fans were or are used to.

The eerieness of this all was when he got the fastest century in test cricket, now that was a real answer to his Sir Tuk Tuk knighthood. That’s what he does, let’s the performance do the talking. In many ways, I personally relate to the Skipper.

Always the oddball in the group but with a menacing calm like no other captain of Pakistan has ever had, according to recent history.

https://youtu.be/BUcs1pcNJaQ

Cricket is one thing very close to our hearts here in Pakistan, and we were hurt in 2010, really hurt. We owe a lot of gratitude to the way Misbah salvaged our price, got the team going into a cohesive competitive unit within no time. You know in team sports, a captain is as good as his team, and that’s why I rate Misbah highly as compared to his predecessors, that he made the best use of what he had and still found a way in being a world beater, our most prolific captain in tests.

You know in team sports, a captain is as good as his team, and that’s why I rate Misbah highly as compared to his predecessors, that he made the best use of what he had and still found a way in being a world beater, our most prolific captain in tests.

He’s taught this generation that it’s not the size of the dog in the fight but the size of the fight in the dog which matters most. His strategy of taking the game right to the end was old school and reminded me of those charming romantic 90’s when cricket was cricket and well less commercially solicited.

This year probably marks the end of MS Dhoni’s international career as well and all eyes will be on Misbah to immortalise his last stint and leave his legacy intact by leading the lads to a first time series win against the West indies.

Tennyson once wrote, ‘authority forgets it’s dying king’, be it in this case to friends and foes alike, we must give homage to the man who led us through stormy waters to a calmer coastline. You don’t have to like him, but at least learn to respect him. Thank you for the memories Captain Sahib, shall be missed.

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Contributed By: Nasr Saeed

Born and raised in Karachi, he is the eldest of the three in the family. Son of an Hotelier and an Educationist (mother), Nasr is a cricket fan since Javed Miandad’s last ball six in Sharjah in 1986. He was associated with the banking industry since the last 13 odd years before joining the Advertisement world.